I am a series producer, director and photographer at BBC studios Natural History Unit in Bristol.

Originally from Rotherham I became fascinated by the Natural World when I found my  first fossil on a beach in Robins Hood Bay on the Yorkshire coast. This eventually led me to work as a palaeontologist at the Natural History Museum in London. In 2002 I was called upon to advise on a BBC series about evolution. Almost twenty years, and many films, later I have filmed in more than 40 countries for high profile series including Life in Cold Blood, Life, Wonders of the Monsoon, Blue Planet II, Big Cats and Attenborough and the Sea Dragon. I most recently produced the highlight, and the greatest challenge of my career – the BBC One series ‘The Green Planet’ with Sir David Attenborough, exploring the world of plants. I produced the Tropical and Desert episodes for which, a decade after my first attempt, I finally managed to capture the story of the rare corpse flower in Borneo.

I am driven by a passion to reveal new perspectives on the natural world and to get cameras closer to the action. Over four years I worked with a team of engineers to develop new technology and techniques for The Green Planet – including a new robotic system that I christened the Triffid (after a monstrous sci-fi plant that terrified me as a child). The Triffid enabled camera crews to reveal the extraordinary world of plants in a way that has not been possible before.

During my  time at the BBC I have worn a space suit of ice to film in the ‘world’s deadliest cave’, climbed one of the highest mountains in Asia in search of a new species of leech as long as my arm, and I led the first team to successfully film the bizarre Pallas’s cat of Mongolia. I love to shine a light on the peculiar and underrepresented members of the natural world, and I am currently producing a new BBC series about lesser known small animals.

Producer Paul Williams with Rafflesia, the corpse flower, in Borneo. During filming for The Green Planet. This rare plant only grows in the wild because it is a parasite on a vine. It smells like rotting flesh and has evolved to mimic a dead animal. It's also the worlds biggest flower.

Paul Williams, dry lake bed

My most memorable encounters:

During my time working with the BBC I have had many memorable experiences, including wearing a space suit of ice, and carrying a fridge to enable me to breathe in one the worlds ‘deadliest’ caves', climbing one of the highest mountains in Asia in the search of a leech as big as my arm, and I was privileged to lead the first team to successfully film the bizarre pallas’s cat of Mongolia. 

Here are a few behind the scenes videos of some of my most memorable shoots..

1. Stalked by one of the world's biggest leopards in the night, Sri Lanka

2. Filming the Swamp Tiger, India (watch the sequence here,  behind the scenes here)

3. The shrew that uses a pitcher plant like a toilet, Borneo 


Here is some advice for wildlife filmmakers that I wrote for the Eden Channel.

Here is a video interview I gave to the Open University following a talk I presented at Wildscreen Film Festival in 2014.


Some of the TV shows that I have worked on...

The Green Planet - BBC One (2022)

Big Cats - BBC One (2018)

Attenborough and the Sea Dragon - BBC One (2018)

Blue Planet II - timelapse - BBC One (2017)

Wild Tales from the Village - timelapse - BBC Two (2016)

Earth's Greatest Spectacles - New England - BBC Two (2016)

Wonders of the Monsoon- BBC Two (2014)

Secrets of Our Living Planet - BBC Two (2012)

Animals Guide to Britain - BBC Two (2011)

How the Earth made us - BBC Two (2010)

Wu-How - Ninjas Guide to Everything - Presenter for BBC3 (2010)

Life - BBC One (2009)

Big Cat Live - digital (2008)

Fossil Detectives - BBC Two - development (2007)

Darwin, Notes from a Genius - BBC Two - (2009)

Life in Cold Blood - BBC One (2008)

Journey of Life - BBC Two (2005)

Britain Goes Wild / Springwatch - BBC Two (2004)

BBC Earth Web Series: Chasing the Monsoon, South India (2009) 

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